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ODS & Adobe Spark Video

Spring is a favorite time of year.  As instructional coaches we are out and about a lot but Spring means Outdoor School and Outdoor School means field studies!  Our region has AMAZING ODS opportunities for students.  Though each program is ran a little differently they all keep the academics and hands on time at the forefront of the students' day.

We are often invited to participate by bringing some technology into mountains.  In the past we have done GPS projects and 360 photos but the past few years we've been using Adobe Spark Video iPad app to make food chain documentaries.  This is just ONE of hundreds of ways to use adobe spark with students.

Starts with a review of the parts of the food chain and storyboard outlines.

Head out with counselors and one iPad looking for evidence of the food chain.

There's always opportunity for some iPad photography tips! 

Now back to the table to create...

and a quiet spot to narrate!

Few tips to go off line with Adobe Spark -

  • Log into the adobe app ahead of time - you will not be able to do this if you are in a remote location with no internet!    A generic account is useful for being able to sync and access all the videos at once online by the teacher.  
  • Have students use the camera to take pictures and then pull photos into the app when they return. 
  • As with many projects - a little guidance is necessary!  A minimum of a title slide photo, one photo for each of the three main parts of a food chain, and a group photo for the end.  Have them put their photos into the app in order before they play with narration, music, or themes.  
  • Save to the camera roll as back up.  

We use this information/brainstorming document to brainstorm examples that we might find evidence of before going on our photo search.

We do all of this is about 50 minutes!   

Here are a few finished student examples:

A Day at Meadowood

Blue Mountain Food Chain 


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